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Sheridan , Oregon
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June 8, 1994     The Sun Paper
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June 8, 1994
 

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Wednesday, June 8, 1994, The Sun 11 FORM ED-2 FUNDS NOT REQUIRING A PROPERTY TAX TO BE LEVIED Publish ONLY completed portion of this page. Total Anticipated Requirements must equal Total Resources. [] Republication Name of ~ ~j/~ "~ ~ ~ Actual Data FunJ~,9~5 Last Year ?~ --IF3 1. Total Instruction 2. Total Supporting Services 3. Total Community Services 4. Total Debt Service 5. Total l'ransters 6, Total Contingencies 7. Total All Other Expenditures and Requirements 8. Total Unappropriated or Ending Fund Balance .. 9. Total Requirements ....................... Adopted Budget Approved Budget. ThisYear 9"3"~'/" NextYear IF'-75 )O 5,:,o 1. Total Instruction ~. Total Supporting Services 3. Total Community Services 4, Total Debt Service S. Total Transfers II. Total Contingandes ..... L Total All Other Expenditures and Requirements .. II. Total Unappropriatad or Ending Fund Balance 9. Total Requirements 1. Total Instruction ..................... Total Supporting Services 3. Total Community Services. 4, Total Debt Service $. Total Transfers 6. Total Contingendes 7. Total All Other Expenditures and Requirements II, Total Unappropriated or Ending Fund Balance Total Requirements Actual Data Last Year ~- ~.3 Adopted Budget Approved Budget This Year ~3-~/ NeXt Year ~--q 5" w q /l Actual Data Adopted Approved Budget Last Year ~,-P- ~.~ Thls Year Next Year ~ ~'--?S" of 1. Total Instruction ;~. Total Supporting Services 3. Total Community Services. 4, Total Debt Service ~i. Total Transfers 6. Total Contingencies 7. Total All Other Expenditures and Requirements Total Unappropdated or Ending Fund Balance .. Requirements Actual Data Last Year ~'~ -- q3 Adopted Budget_ Approved Budget " This Year ~'3 -?5/ Next Year. ~'5"~ of 6- S A Actual Data Adopted Budget . Approved Budget Last Year c7~'..'~This Year~ Next Year q q-'~" Total Instruction Total Supporting Services Total Community Services. Total Debt Service Total Transfers Total Contingencies Total All Other Expenditures and Requirements or Ending Fund Balance .. ulramonts ....................... /~oo0 000 I Actual Data Last Year ~'~ - Y .~ This Year Approved Budget Next Year ~'~-~'~" ,Total Instruction .......................... Senhces ............. ; .... ' Total Debt Service ............ .. ........... ' Total Transfers ........................... Total C0ntingondas ~ ..................... Total All Other Expenditures and Requirements . Fund Balance Requirements ' ,5 Y T'P TOtal Instruction }tal Services Services. ' TOtal Debt Service Total Transfers Total Contingencies , Total All Other Expenditures and Requirements or Ending Fund Balance Actual Data Last Year ~'~ - ~'~ Approved Budget Next Year ~-000. I~000 ~d Actual Data Last Year ~ -'~ Adopted Budget Approved Budget ThisYear ~3-'~9' NextYear_ ~'~'--F~" 0tal Instruction .......................... Services .................. i Services .................. ~tal Debt Service ........................ 0tal Transfers ........................... Contingencies ....................... All Other Expenditures and Requirements . Unappropriatad or Ending Fund Balance . Requiraments ....................... :~:~~~:'':~:~ '":':- ~i~!~ .......... ~./00 b '/,% lad .YOO Actual Data Last Year %-3 --~ Adopted Budget Approved Budget This Year~ Next Year ~'q'-7> Supporting Services .................. Community San, lces .................. Dobt Service ........................ -# i - ,~ Contlnganoes ........................ Requiremanta .. nappropctatad or Ending Fund Balance Services ' Services Actual Data Last Year 9,,~-~.~ Adopted~Budget Approved Budget This Year ~ Next Year Transfers ....... !andes .~... I Other Expenditures and Requiremants .. Fund Balance .. Instruction Services .......... , Services Ending Fund Balance .. 3 -S],o o 3 -poo I Actual Data Adopted Budget Approved Budget LastYear ~,~-~=~ ThisYear ~..,=-'qqNextYear ~f/.-~s" /0o0 /~60 '\ \ 717"/ 70/ / Publish: The Sun, June 8, 1994. Logging horse was used in bronc riding By Phil Hodgen Special Writer, The Sun Clarence Schukar has come a long way since he donated lumber and his muscles to build the grand- stands at the Sheridan Rodeo back in the 1930s. With lumber in short supply and no way to get what could be milled to the rodeo grounds, the young Schukar found a solution and a special place for himself in the history of the rodeo which is cele- brating its 60th year. Schukar fondly recalls some of the early rodeo days. "Ray Brown brought a big old black horse he had been logging with for the bronc riding," he remembers. "Thinking a horse used for that purpose would be an easy ride, every cowboy tried him--but nobody rode him." In the early days, the rodeo events took place behind a temporary fence and weren't as predictable as they are today. "I told the ropers that when they threw their first loop they better make it because they wouldn't get a second chance," Schukar remem- bers. With the support of his wife, Ruth, he was a guiding force and lifeblood of the fledgling rodeo. "In the early days, we had a five to seven member board just to have enough help to put on the rodeo. It was a lot better doing it that way than scurrying for help during the last days before the show." The Phil Sheridan Days parade at one time went right through the rodeo arena, Schukar recalls. It didn't work out very well one year, however. "One year it rained so hard it took us three hours to get everyone out," Schukar recalls. Clarence and Ruth coordinated the rodeo queen and court selection from 1948 to 1980 when the rodeo was turned over to the West Valley Continued from Page 1 Asked if he knew how the board could demand Audet's keys, Elstun said: "I don't know how it could be done." Elstun said the action, which seems to parallel a coup in a Third World country, doesn't seem to follow any policies or procedures. "It's bothered me over the last year as you know that they haven't followed procedures outlined in board policy and in some cases have violated state law," Elstun said. But Elstun blamed Audet for the board's failings. "That's the super- intendent's responsibility to make sure they do (follow the laws and policies)," he said. Elstun expressed shock that Christina Brown, board chairperson, did not know about Zagar's action before it happened. According to one source, the rest of the board is upset with Brown over the way Audet's recent evalua- tion was handled. This source claimed that Brown prepared the evaluation on her own and asked the board to approve it. Brown was also the only board member to vote against reinstating Don Yates as high school principal. Contract detailed The Willamina school board can fire Larry Audet as superintendent without giving any reasons provid- ing they pay off the remainder of a two-year contract and give him 10 days written notice. Those conditions are part of a 7-page employment contract signed by Audet on May ! 4, 1993 when he was hired. He started work July I. The contract notes that Audet will be paid $59,000 a year and the board will evaluate his performance no later than Feb. 15 each year. The contract also provides for a one-year extension by written notice before April 1, 1994. Both Audet's evaluation and con- tract extension have become the subject of debate after he became embroiled in arguments over mov- ing Willamina High School princi- pal Don Yates to a new job in the district's administrative offices. Several community leaders who objected to Yates's move questioned whether Audet's contract had auto- matically been extended or whether his evaluation was done properly. In Clarence Schukar, one of the founders of the Sheridan Rodeo back in the 1930s, holds mounted horns from a Texas longhorn.---Photo by Phil Hodgen. Chamber of Commerce. The rodeo has been sponsored by the local Kiwanis Club for the past eight years since the original rodeo group the grounds over to the service club. Working with the young girls in the court over the years was usually a lot of fun for the Schukars. In the early 1950s their daughter, Carol, served as queen. But Clarence still remembers one girl who left the rodeo in the lurch by telling him three weeks before the event that she was moving to California. "Fortunately, we kept track of the runner-up so I quickly outfitted her at Vans and we had a full court for the show." The Schukars' photo album that traces the history of the Sheridan Rodeo includes some star horse flesh. One local horse doubled for the equine lead in the 1946 movie "Thunderhead" and was featured in "Son of Fiicka." Schukar is concerned about the future of the rodeo grounds. He opposes the Kiwanis Club's plans to sell off part of the grounds for housing lots to pay off operating expenses. He also wants to see the Phil Sheridan Days and the rodeo sup- port each other. At one time, he notes, the Sheridan and Portland Rose Festival parades were sched- uled on the same Saturday in June. "We then went to a night parade so we would have some participants in our parade and not have to be in two places at the same time." Schukar for many years took care of the O.C Yokum ranch on Rock Creek Road. The ranch raised Texas longhorn cattle--the kind of live- stock that makes a rodeo man feel right at home. response, a majority of school board members said at a public meeting during the Yates controversy that they had not voted to extend Audet's contract. Bruce Zagar, the district's attor- ney, later confirmed the school board had violated Oregon laws dealing with public meetings by failing to review the superinten- dent's evaluation form in a public session. To rectify the situation the board was forced to release Audet's confidential evaluation. That evaluation gave Audet high marks in most areas but one source has claimed that the report was prepared by Christina Brown, board chairperson, rather than involving all board members in the process. Attorney is mum Bruce Zagar, Willamina school district's attorney, said "no com- ment" to nearly all questions posed to him on Monday. Those questions included: Under what authority did he act when he asked Superintendent Larry Audet to turn over his keys last Thursday? How could the school board meet to request such action when no notice of any meeting has been given? Was there an emergency board meeting held without the require- ment to notify the media? Has a complaint been filed against Audet? How could Christina Brown, board chairperson, not know about the action to take Audet's keys beforehand when the rest of the board apparently did? Zagar did confirm a closed-door executive session of the school board had been scheduled for 6 p.m. last night. "I'm not sure what will come out of it (the executive session)," Zagar said. He said he was not sure whether the board would make an announcement or take action after the meeting. 'My name is defamed' Asked if he would continue work- ing in Willamina if the board asked him to, Audet said Sunday night he had not decided. "It's difficult to answer that until Tuesday," he said. Audet said the news about him losing his school keys had spread throughout the state by Sunday night. "My name is defamed," he complained. He said the complaint against him was generated by a member of the staff and he had learned more about it on Sunday night. He refused to specify what he had learned, how- ever. "It's laughable that anyone would believe it," Audet said. Audet, who has been placed on admmtstrattve leave, said the board should investigate the complaint before it takes action and suggested last night's meeting might not pro- vide enough time to resolve the matter. "I'd like to see truth prevail and trust restored. I'd like to start focus- ing on what's best for the kids," he said. One source indicated that the complaint was filed by Chrys Davis, deputy clerk. Audet had complained recently about some problems involving Davis's work on the proposed 1994- 95 budget which forced the staff to make about $150,000 in last-minute cuts. He said he had requested tighter controls on district funds and staff cross-training after problems were raised by the auditor. The auditor, however, has indi- cated Wiilamina's financial control problems are common to small school districts. No questions of fraud or embezzlement have ever been raised in the audits. Grant awarded for timber workers The Mid-Willamette Jobs Council has been awarded a $600,000 grant to help permanently laid off timber and wood products workers prepare for new jobs. The money is part of a $5 million grant awarded to the state under the Northwest Economic Adjustment Initiative project. Individuals who may be eligible should contact the nearest office of the Mid-Willamette .lobs Council. Offices are located in Salem, Wood- burn, Dallas and McMinnville. Contact persons are: Salem, Gary Lanctot, 399-2336; Woodburn, Selaina Miller, 981-8225; Dallas, Mike Warnock, 623-6682; and McMinnville, Pat Allen, 434-4446.